Digital humanities and Assyriology: tools for an “online” history of the ancient Middle East

List of projects
 

Digital humanities and Assyriology: tools for an “online” history of the ancient Middle East

  • Presentation
  • Downloads
Digital humanities and Assyriology:  tools for an “online” history of the ancient Middle East
©CDLI/Ashmolean Museum Oxford

Building on the international Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI), the project aims to explore and develop new means of writing an “online” history of the ancient Middle East, by drawing on a collection of digital data accumulated over the last few years in several Assyriological database projects. The project will exploit the rich information held in these digital databases and make it more accessible to scholars and the general public.

What good are these new data in the age of the digital humanities when one buckles down to write history? Besides experimenting with new means of accessing the data in order to support and to facilitate historical investigations, this project also addresses the manner by which all these new digital tools modify the practice of the historian’s craft.

In terms of developing innovative tools and interfaces, the ultimate goal is to better highlight a particularly ancient, fragile, and threatened cultural heritage that consists of tens of thousands of cuneiform clay tablets going back to the very origins of the recorded history.

Project leader
Bertrand LAFONT, CNRS director of research, Archeologies and Sciences of Antiquity (ArScAn)
Jacob L. DAHL, university lecturer, Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

Internal cluster partners
Archeologies and Sciences of Antiquity (ArScAn, UMR 7041)
French National Library, Department of coins, medals, and antiquities
Maison Archeology and Ethnology, René-Ginouvès (MAE, USR 3225)

Associated partner
Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

Duration: 2 years

documents to download